Mentoring

Mentoring

This service adopt a person-centred approach. Occasionally, children may struggle with certain elements of growing up. Of course, this is entirely natural though they may benefit from additional support through mentoring or coaching. Feeling that their voice is being heard can give children an outlet to share their thoughts, feelings, worries or concerns and help identify how they can be supported.

Traditional mentoring and coaching sessions look at everyday issues, such as friendship/relationship concerns, typical school struggles or other social, emotional or mental health concerns which may be outside the capacity of schools and below the threshold for external services. This services adopts a person-centred approach, allowing the individual to highlight support they feel is relevant and necessary to them whilst also aiming to develop their own self-awareness, confidence and independence.

Mentoring is the practice of advising, supporting and guiding our children through times of struggle or difficulty. I consider the relationship between mentor and student to be a highly important starting point and session by session, a boost in confidence, esteem and self-awareness can be developed. As a person-centred practitioner, I am aware that every child I work with is unique. There is no one glove fits all approach and the work I undertake, for me, has to have the child at the heart of it, be valuable to them and lead to positive outcomes - whatever that may look like to the child.
Andy Heaton, Owner

Mentoring Services

Primary to Secondary Mentoring

Heading off to secondary education can be a worrying, anxiety-inducing time for children. The thought of the significant changes moving to secondary school can bring often pushes our children outside of their comfort zone; trying to take on all the new rules, standards and expectations for some can be a truly daunting task.

To help prepare children for the challenges ahead, a course of transition mentoring may help. Drawing on personal experiences of the transition process, sessions cover core skills, such as organisation and communication whilst also looking at general high school life and what to expect.

Traditional mentoring/coaching

Sometimes children just need to feel their voice is being heard. Using a person-centred approach, children are able to express what support they feel they need in the pastoral field. Traditional mentoring and coaching sessions look at everyday issues, such as friendship/relationship concerns, typical struggles with school and other social, emotional or mental health concerns which may be outside the capacity of schools and below threshold for external services.

This service seeks to improve an individual’s self-awareness, allowing them to develop their own answers to problems in a supportive yet independent way.